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Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy issued this statement after the Texas Workforce Commission and Gov. Greg Abbott decided to waive waiting periods and work-search requirements for Texans who lose their jobs because of the coronavirus.

Following Gov. Greg Abbott's Disaster Declaration, Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy today issued this statement on behalf of the state labor federation:

As the coronavirus threatens Texans, the Texas AFL-CIO today called on political and business leaders to take actions suggested by front-line union workers who face elevated risk of becoming ill.

The Texas AFL-CIO will hold a news conference to address Texas workplace issues surrounding the coronavirus and call for work-related actions by public officials and employers to help in the battle against the illness.

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President Trump released a $4.8 trillion budget proposal on Monday that includes a familiar list of deep cuts to student loan assistance, affordable housing efforts, food stamps and Medicaid, reflecting Mr. Trump’s election-year effort to continue shrinking the federal safety net. The proposal, which is unlikely to be approved in its entirety by Congress, includes additional spending for the military, national defense and border enforcement, along with money for veterans, Mr.

'A Fighter for Working People Who Set the Highest Standard of Solidarity'

Working families in Texas are mourning Emmett Sheppard, a former Texas AFL-CIO President who built the state labor federation's voice and capacity against long political odds. Sheppard died Saturday at the age of 77.

Union leaders and labor rights advocates applauded the Democrat-controlled U.S. House for passing landmark legislation Thursday night that supporters have called one of the most notable efforts to expand workers' rights in several decades. "Make no mistake, this is the most significant step Congress has taken to strengthen labor laws in the United States in 85 years and a win for workers everywhere," said AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka, declaring the measure "the labor movement's number one legislative priority this year."

Support for the labor movement is the highest in nearly half a century, yet only one in 10 workers are members of unions today. How can both be true?

A recent Gallup poll found that 64% of Americans approve of unions and research from MIT shows nearly half of non-union workers—more than 60 million people—would vote to join today if given the opportunity. Twenty-five years ago, only one-third of workers said the same thing.

Voters in CD 28 need their representative in Congress to match up with their hopes and aspirations, not function as Donald Trump's favorite Democrat.

The Republican-controlled National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) ended 2019 by rolling back another round of Obama-era regulations and handing down a number of pro-employer decisions. One of those rulings restricts workers from wearing union buttons and other pro-labor insignia. The Organization United for Respect at Walmart (Our Walmart) had challenged a company policy limiting the size of union buttons for employees of the retail corporation. The group seemingly had momentum on its side.