Texas AFL-CIO

THE VOICE OF LABOR IN TEXAS

We are teachers, firefighters and farm workers, actors and engineers, pilots and public employees, painters and plumbers, steelworkers and screenwriters, doctors and nurses, stagehands, electricians and more. We believe that people who work make Texas work and that together, we are better.

 

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Every Texan who is willing to work hard and do their part deserves a fair shot to get ahead. 

It's time we hold politicians accountable and demand they stand up for policies that help working families.

Featured Stories

Continuing on the success of their 2017 legislative issues door-to-door field program, the Texas AFL-CIO announced the launch of their 2018 Neighborhood Field Program.

Activists for paid sick leave in San Antonio, including representatives of organized labor, have filed more than twice the number of signatures needed to place the measure on the November ballot, the Texas Observer reports.

It's no secret that the financial divide between CEOs and average worker in the U.S. has been growing.

Texas voters spoke clearly and in bipartisan fashion for progress in Tuesday’s runoff elections, endorsing an agenda in which public education and the larger concerns of working people take priority over wedge issues, Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy said today.

Recent News

Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy issued this statement congratulating Lupe Valdez, the COPE-backed candidate, on winning the Democratic nomination for Governor: 

“Lupe Valdez believes in her heart in economic progress for all Texans. She is the antithesis of Gov. Greg Abbott and a Republican leadership that has placed wedge issues like private school vouchers, immigrant-bashing, “bathroom bills,” denial of health coverage for hundreds of thousands of Texans, and other proposals that rig the rules against working people at the center of Texas priorities.”

An ideologically divided Supreme Court ruled Monday that companies may require workers to settle employment disputes through individual arbitration rather than joining to press their complaints, a decision affecting as many as 25 million workers.

The court's conservative majority said that the 5-to-4 ruling was a logical reading of federal law, and Congress' preference for using arbitration to avoid costly and time-consuming litigation.

The Guardian obtained an anti-union toolkit already being used by the billionaire-backed anti-union apparatus ahead of the U.S. Supreme Court's looming decision in the Janus case, which could lead to so-called "right to work" for public-sector workers across the U.S. 

President Trump’s attention of late has been focused in part on the United States Postal Service and Amazon, resulting in a new executive order calling for an evaluation of USPS finances. This is a good opportunity to underscore some important facts regarding the Postal Service, a national treasure belonging to all the people of the United States.