Texas AFL-CIO

THE VOICE OF LABOR IN TEXAS

We are teachers, firefighters and farm workers, actors and engineers, pilots and public employees, painters and plumbers, steelworkers and screenwriters, doctors and nurses, stagehands, electricians and more. We believe that people who work make Texas work and that together, we are better.

 

237,000+

460+

20,000+

Affiliated MembersAffiliates & LocalsActivists

 

Featured Stories

58 UNITE HERE-represented airline catering workers and their supporters were arrested on Tuesday morning after participating in a nonviolent act of civil disobedience outside of American Airlines’ new corporate headquarters.

 State Federation OPPOSES Proposition 4

The Texas AFL-CIO Committee on Political Education (COPE) announced endorsements for Nov. 5 special elections and a constitutional proposition vote, setting the stage for stepped-up labor participation in the 2020 election cycle.

"From his first day in office, José Rodríguez has been a courageous leader in the Texas Senate.

Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy and Secretary-Treasurer Montserrat Garibay issued the following Labor Day statement on the deadly shooting spree in the Permian Basin:
 

Take Action

Every Texan who is willing to work hard and do their part deserves a fair shot to get ahead. 

It's time we hold politicians accountable and demand they stand up for policies that help working families.

What We Care About

Member Spotlight

"I know that it’s not just about me. It's about fighting for everyone no matter what their situation is.”
Our union has kept me going. It has given me hope.
Being in a union means I have a voice. Whether it's regarding safety, pay or even work practices, my voice will be heard and that's one of the greatest rights I can think of.
"I proudly construct buildings in DFW. My union helped me better my immigration status and apply for U.S. Citizenship."
The labor movement means solidarity.
I believe plumbing and pipefitting experience gained through my local union allows me to make a living wage.

Recent News

It was just a decade ago that the Great Recession — the worst economic disaster since the Great Depression — upended life for hundreds of millions of Americans. More than 8 million people across the country lost their jobs. Millions more lost their homes and life savings.

The economy has made steady improvements since 2008, but recovery has disproportionately favored wealthier Americans.

One of the workshops at the Connecticut AFL-CIO’s two-day convention that opened here Thursday explored the lessons offered from “worker power resurgence,” a reference to labor’s extraordinary year of strikes and other work stoppages in 2018.

For decades, working families could depend on labor unions to represent their collective interests -- ensuring a living wage, better benefits and a voice in their workplace. Now, after 50 years of rollbacks on union and labor rights, workers have been silenced at their jobs. The Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act is an opportunity for Congress to give working families their voice back.

A decade ago, General Motors was on the verge of collapse. Facing down an earth-shattering financial crisis, tens of thousands of UAW members agreed to help save an American icon — and the economy along with it.

Autoworkers took on personal financial sacrifices, conceding contract victories that had taken years to secure. Working harder and longer for less, they ultimately carried GM out of bankruptcy and into a period of record-breaking profits.