Texas AFL-CIO

THE VOICE OF LABOR IN TEXAS

We are teachers, firefighters and farm workers, actors and engineers, pilots and public employees, painters and plumbers, steelworkers and screenwriters, doctors and nurses, stagehands, electricians and more. We believe that people who work make Texas work and that together, we are better.

 

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Featured Stories

The two-day Texas AFL-CIO COPE Convention concluded today with endorsements in statewide, congressional, and legislative contests.
The list may be found here: 
In Texas, the two major political parties – Democratic and Republican – hold primary elections to decide who will represent them on Election Day in November. The November “General Election” decides who gets to hold office.

Take Action

Our USW brothers and sisters at ASARCO are on the line striking for better pay and working conditions. 

Please make a donation that will go straight to the picket line. 

What We Care About

Member Spotlight

"I know that it’s not just about me. It's about fighting for everyone no matter what their situation is.”
Our union has kept me going. It has given me hope.
Being in a union means I have a voice. Whether it's regarding safety, pay or even work practices, my voice will be heard and that's one of the greatest rights I can think of.
"I proudly construct buildings in DFW. My union helped me better my immigration status and apply for U.S. Citizenship."
The labor movement means solidarity.
I believe plumbing and pipefitting experience gained through my local union allows me to make a living wage.

Recent News

President Trump released a $4.8 trillion budget proposal on Monday that includes a familiar list of deep cuts to student loan assistance, affordable housing efforts, food stamps and Medicaid, reflecting Mr. Trump’s election-year effort to continue shrinking the federal safety net. The proposal, which is unlikely to be approved in its entirety by Congress, includes additional spending for the military, national defense and border enforcement, along with money for veterans, Mr.

'A Fighter for Working People Who Set the Highest Standard of Solidarity'

Working families in Texas are mourning Emmett Sheppard, a former Texas AFL-CIO President who built the state labor federation's voice and capacity against long political odds. Sheppard died Saturday at the age of 77.

Union leaders and labor rights advocates applauded the Democrat-controlled U.S. House for passing landmark legislation Thursday night that supporters have called one of the most notable efforts to expand workers' rights in several decades. "Make no mistake, this is the most significant step Congress has taken to strengthen labor laws in the United States in 85 years and a win for workers everywhere," said AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka, declaring the measure "the labor movement's number one legislative priority this year."

Support for the labor movement is the highest in nearly half a century, yet only one in 10 workers are members of unions today. How can both be true?

A recent Gallup poll found that 64% of Americans approve of unions and research from MIT shows nearly half of non-union workers—more than 60 million people—would vote to join today if given the opportunity. Twenty-five years ago, only one-third of workers said the same thing.