Texas AFL-CIO

THE VOICE OF LABOR IN TEXAS

We are teachers, firefighters and farm workers, actors and engineers, pilots and public employees, painters and plumbers, steelworkers and screenwriters, doctors and nurses, stagehands, electricians and more. We believe that people who work make Texas work and that together, we are better.

 

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Every Texan who is willing to work hard and do their part deserves a fair shot to get ahead. 

It's time we hold politicians accountable and demand they stand up for policies that help working families.

Featured Stories

Congressional candidate Gina Ortiz Jones, Senate candidate Pete Gallego and other outstanding San Antonio-area candidates have earned the endorsement of the Texas AFL-CIO Committee on Political Education (COPE) and the San Antonio Central Labor Council ahead of the Nov. 6 election.

Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy and San Antonio Central Labor Council President Tom Cummings issued this joint statement in response to a 9-2 vote by the San Antonio City Council to enact an earned paid sick leave ordinance:

The Texas AFL-CIO today saluted Sen. Sylvia Garcia, D-Houston, on her plan to resign from the Texas Senate, saying she acted in the best interest of her district and the state of Texas.

The Texas AFL-CIO will host a media availability on the Janus ruling at 1:30 p.m. today, June 27, in the Becky Moeller Auditorium at 1106 Lavaca St., in downtown Austin.

Recent News

A law to free nonunion workers from paying union dues has been undone by Missouri voters, a victory for labor organizers who spent millions of dollars to organize a “no” campaign. “It’s a clear message that they want to go a different way,” said AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka. “They want workers to have a bigger say.”
The Trump administration is considering bypassing Congress to grant a $100 billion tax cut mainly to the wealthy, a legally tenuous maneuver that would cut capital gains taxation and fulfill a long-held ambition of many investors and conservatives.
Congressional Republicans and President Trump continue to push their sole legislative accomplishment, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, as a game-changer for average working Americans — but the benefits of that bill appear to be going mostly to the people at the top.
The union-backed fight against making Missouri a "Right to Work" state has enlisted some star power to get its message out. Actor John Goodman is featured in a 30-second radio ad saying a law that will be decided by Missouri voters in the Aug. 7 primary election will hurt the middle class.