News

Latest Releases

Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy, joined by a group of unemployed Texans on the eve of the cancellation of the $600 per week in unemployment coronavirus federal aid, pushed for the US Senate to pass the HEROES Act.
The Texas AFL-CIO today congratulated M.J. Hegar on winning the Democratic nomination for the U.S. Senate seat, calling on Texans to vote on Nov. 3 for a new national path on issues that matter to working families.

 The Texas AFL-CIO and Every Texan (formerly known as the Center for Public Policy Priorities) today proposed a 10-point plan for reforming the Unemployment Insurance system in Texas.

Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy and Secretary-Treasurer Montserrat Garibay posted this statement on Gov. Greg Abbott’s rollback of Executive Orders to reopen the state:

Press Kits

Legislative Director
Campaigns Director
Communications Director
President
Secretary-Treasurer

Recent Press Releses

Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy statement on Gov. Greg Abbott’s Executive Orders today on plans to reopen Texas during the coronavirus pandemic:

“Today’s announcement by Gov. Greg Abbott answered next to none of the pressing questions working people have about how a reopening of the state will protect them and how Texas will help preserve their livelihoods as the coronavirus moves through our population.”

As the coronavirus threatens Texans, the Texas AFL-CIO today called on political and business leaders to take actions suggested by front-line union workers who face elevated risk of becoming ill.

"Texans looking to steer clear of the coronavirus and safeguard their families know that protecting working people protects communities," Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy, joined by representatives of several unions, said at a news conference.

The labor movement owes a debt of gratitude to Representative Eddie Rodriguez and Senator-elect Sarah Eckhardt for the ways in which they each elevated the voices of working families in the special election for Senate District 14.

The labor movement in Texas is saddened by the death of John Bland, whose history-making civil rights and labor activism helped integrate Houston and bring hard-working families into the middle class.

More than three years after taking office, the administration has never filled the job running the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which is charged with enforcing workplace safety laws. The $560 million-a-year agency, whose estimated 2,000 inspectors performed 32,020 on-site inspections in 2018, spent months not doing any in-person inspections related to coronavirus, other than in hospitals, said Rebecca Reindel, director of occupational safety and health for the AFL-CIO.