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The Texas AFL-CIO commended President Joe Biden today for Executive Orders and other actions that lay out a better path for the United States, including justice for millions of immigrants in Texas and the nation.
The Texas AFL-CIO today celebrated the inauguration of Joe Biden as President and Kamala Harris as Vice President, calling upon all of us to work together to build a better nation.
In the coming weeks, the Texas AFL-CIO will advance a revised version of our Fair Shot Agenda that advocates for working families in the context of the pandemic. We call on the 87th Texas Legislature to act in bipartisan fashion to ease suffering and build for better days ahead.

The Texas AFL-CIO issued the following statement regarding Trump's visit to Texas:

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When you order food through an app and tip the worker who delivers it, you’d be forgiven for thinking that the money you give goes directly to that person. But in reality, some delivery apps use your tip to make up the worker’s base pay — essentially stealing the money you’re trying to give someone to maximize their profits.

Donald Trump ran for president on the idea that he would help struggling Americans, the "forgotten man" as he referred to these implicitly white workers, rise up after years of neglect from a shifty labor market and stagnant wages.

When Honolulu UNITE HERE member Scott Abfalter walked out on a union-sanctioned strike last fall, he was able to get some financial assistance from an unexpected source. As a Union Plus Credit Cardholder, he was eligible for the Union Plus Strike Grant.

This week, millions of consumers flocked to Amazon looking for a deal on Prime Day, which brought in more than $3.9 billion for the retail giant last year. Maybe you were one of those shoppers.

I was raised in a company house, in a company town, where the miners had to buy their own oilers – that is, rubber coveralls – drill bits, and other tools at the company store.

That company, Inco Limited, the world’s leading producer of nickel for most of the 20th century, controlled the town of Sudbury, Ontario, but never succeeded in owning the souls of the men and women who lived and worked there.

That’s because these were union men and women: self-possessed, a little rowdy, and well aware that puny pleas from individual workers fall on deaf corporate ears.