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The November 18 meeting of the Dallas AFL-CIO Central Labor Council revealed that labor is in an unprecedented activity boom.

The Dallas AFL-CIO Central Labor Council will meet "In Real Life" at 7:30PM on Thursday, November 18, at 1408 N Washington. All members of affiliated unions are invited.

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NYT: How did you get your start in the labor movement?

Liz Shuler: I came up through the IBEW [International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers]. My father was a union member and worked for PGE [an Oregon utility]. Clerical workers were not in a union, and my mother and I were organizing them. PGE was a study in the difference a union can make: Power linemen were respected and made good wages, and nonunion clerical workers were not listened to and didn’t have a voice.

North Texans have an opportunity to support the Texas Climate Jobs Project on Monday night in Fort Worth. The organization springs from the Texas AFL-CIO. The Sierra Club and the United Auto Workers are also sponsoring the Town Hall meeting at 6:30 PM in the Machinists Lodge, 7711 Clifford Street. 

America's many successful labor strikes are only the visible part of union success. Even without public action, union locals are improving wages and benefits all over the nation. Working families love this upsurge. A recent poll showed that 74% of Americans approve of the October strike wave!

The picket line has been crowded lately. Tens of thousands of workers are on strike, including nurses in Massachusetts, United Auto Workers at John Deere, coal miners in Alabama, metal workers in West Virginia, hospital workers in New York, ironworkers in Pennsylvania and Kellogg’s workers in four states.

Workers at companies like Kellogg’s, Nabisco and John Deere have hit the picket lines in recent weeks hoping to get a better deal from their employers. A new survey suggests the public by and large supports them.

The AFL-CIO labor federation commissioned the progressive pollster Data for Progress to take the public’s temperature on the strikes that have made headlines this summer and fall. The online survey of nearly 1,300 likely voters asked if they “approve or disapprove of employees going on strike in support of better wages, benefits, and working conditions.”

The Dallas AFL-CIO Central Labor Council held a ZOOM meeting on the third Thursday, October 21. President Ray Oliver Edmondson guided the delegates through four important motions:

* Carrying out voter registration activities

* Endorsing Brandon Murden for Mesquite City Council District 6  

* Supporting the Medicare for All Resolution

* Supporting the Labor in the Philippines Resolution

Marcial Reyes could have just quit his job. Frustrated with chronic understaffing at the Kaiser Permanente hospital where he works in Southern California, he knows he has options in a region desperate for nurses.

Instead, he voted to go on strike.

And many of them are either hitting the picket lines or quitting their jobs as a result.

The changing dynamics of the US labor market, which has put employees rather than employers in the driver's seat in a way not seen for decades, is allowing unions to flex their muscle.