Working Texas

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The Texas AFL-CIO welcomes Amanda Cavazos Weems as Field Organizer. Sister Cavazos Weems will provide an added spark to various forms of organizing.

Jean Hervey of Dallas, a Vice President of Workers United SEIU, has won a prestigious national award recognizing her years of work raising funds to combat sickle-cell anemia.

The Trump Labor Department wants to let under-age teenagers work with dangerous equipment for hours at a time as part of their apprenticeship training, upsetting decades of established safety rules.

Lest there be any doubt about the real impetus for paycheck deception legislation, look no further than Oklahoma.

The Sooner State recently saw an unlikely but successful teacher strike stemming from that state's neglect of public schools.

Think Progress reports some lawmakers are trying to take revenge on the union behind the strike, looking to convert a bill that started as an effort to fight child abuse into a vehicle for taking away the freedom of public school employees to choose to steer a portion of their own paycheck to labor association dues.

In the inside baseball of the labor movement's legislative advocacy in Texas, Eric Hartman of the Texas American Federation of Teachers has been an ace pitcher and All-Star.

Texas AFT reports Hartman, the union's legislative director for more than two decades, has retired.

Texas AFL-CIO Lead Organizer Kara Sheehan reports the second Ruth Ellinger Labor Leaders School concluded successfully over the weekend with an absorbing final session and graduation.

Sheehan and Texas AFL-CIO Director of Campaigns Jeff Rotkoff have led the way in building something beautiful, opening new avenues toward leadership for activists in our movement. The connections built in this program are going to make a difference for years to come.

On behalf of the officers and staff of the Texas AFL-CIO, I have the honor of speaking in favor of Item 78, the proposal to rename a road in honor of Azie Taylor Morton, the 36th Treasurer of the United States.

For the 27th year in a row, the AFL-CIO has produced Death on the Job: The Toll of Neglect. The report gathers evidence on the state of safety and health protections for America's workers.

Earlier this month, American Federation of Government Employees President J. David Cox Sr., a former Veterans Administration nurse, called -- yet again -- for the federal government to fund the VA at a level that allows nurses and others in VA hospitals to do their jobs as they were trained to do. 

You may remember the strike at Maximus Coffee Group in Houston in 2013. Late last week, we learned the remaining 279 union employees at what was once a landmark Maxwell House plant are soon going to be out of work.

Sadly, the coffee processing business in the U.S. has gone the way of many other lines of manufacturing. 

 The Texas AFL-CIO stood in solidarity with workers at the plant in the Second Ward when they walked off their jobs to protest company proposals to cut pay by nearly half, eliminate a 401(k) match and increase the cost of health care by 30 percent.