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Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy posted this statement on the one-year anniversary of the insurrection at the U.S.

A labor-to-labor, door-to-door campaign fell short on Election Day in Texas House District 118 but marked a return to full-scale, in-person union campaigning that sets the stage for a high-stakes 2

  Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy issued this statement on completion of the third, and we hope final, special session of the Texas Legislature:

As the Texas Legislature considers how to allocate funds provided through the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (“ARPA”) of 2021, Texas labor unions believe workers must take priority.

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Texas voters spoke clearly and in bipartisan fashion for progress in Tuesday’s runoff elections, endorsing an agenda in which public education and the larger concerns of working people take priority over wedge issues, Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy said today.

CEO pay for major companies in the United States rose nearly 6% in the past year, as income inequality and the outsourcing of good-paying American jobs have increased. According to the new AFL-CIO Executive Paywatch, the average CEO of an S&P 500 Index company made $13.94 million in 2017—361 times more money than the average U.S. rank-and-file worker.

Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy issued this statement congratulating Lupe Valdez, the COPE-backed candidate, on winning the Democratic nomination for Governor: 

“Lupe Valdez believes in her heart in economic progress for all Texans. She is the antithesis of Gov. Greg Abbott and a Republican leadership that has placed wedge issues like private school vouchers, immigrant-bashing, “bathroom bills,” denial of health coverage for hundreds of thousands of Texans, and other proposals that rig the rules against working people at the center of Texas priorities.”

An ideologically divided Supreme Court ruled Monday that companies may require workers to settle employment disputes through individual arbitration rather than joining to press their complaints, a decision affecting as many as 25 million workers.

The court's conservative majority said that the 5-to-4 ruling was a logical reading of federal law, and Congress' preference for using arbitration to avoid costly and time-consuming litigation.

President Trump’s attention of late has been focused in part on the United States Postal Service and Amazon, resulting in a new executive order calling for an evaluation of USPS finances. This is a good opportunity to underscore some important facts regarding the Postal Service, a national treasure belonging to all the people of the United States.

It only takes a moment talking to Emily Galvin, an apprentice with Ironworkers Local 7 in Boston, to grasp how her first year learning the skilled trades has transformed her life. For one, she has a fresh understanding of the anatomy of a city—of roads, bridges and buildings. She’s taking classes in structural steel, tension, rebar and labor history. “I love how we use mats of rebar,” Ms. Galvin says, “to make reinforced concrete for floors or knee-walls, like for a parking garage.”