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The political arm of the Texas AFL-CIO today delivered a dual endorsement of M.J. Hegar and Royce West in the U.S. Senate race.

Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy commended U.S. Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Austin, and the other 12 Democratic members of the Texas congressional delegation for proposing a temporary boost for unemployed Texans.
Gov. Greg Abbott’s plan to start reopening Texas businesses lacks critical elements that would protect Texans who are required to return to their work premises, Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy said today.

The Texas AFL-CIO today called for Texas to presume that front-line working people who contract COVID-19 should receive Workers' Compensation benefits.

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Continuing on the success of their 2017 legislative issues door-to-door field program, the Texas AFL-CIO announced the launch of their 2018 Neighborhood Field Program.

Organized labor managed an increasingly rare feat on Monday — a political victory — when its allies turned back a Senate measure aimed at rolling back labor rights on tribal lands.

The legislation, called the Tribal Labor Sovereignty Act, would have exempted enterprises owned and operated by Native American tribes from federal labor standards, even for employees who were not tribal citizens.

When working people in Austin achieved a historic paid sick leave ordinance, it was just the beginning.

Now, a move to expand the common-sense initiative that promotes both justice and public health in Texas has launched in two more cities.

The objective is to place a proposed ordinance identical to Austin's on the ballot in both San Antonio and Dallas. Well-attended news conferences displaying a broad array of supporters took place in both cities today.

Mike Siegel’s campaign for the 10th Congressional District of Texas has recognized a union to represent its campaign workers, joining a growing movement of political campaigns with unionized staff.

The notion of bringing home 80 cents for every dollar pocketed by a man on a national basis is unsettling enough. But it's even more startling when those lost wages are added up.

Overall, it amounts to $10,000 in lost wages a year, says Debra Ness, president of the National Partnership for Women and Families. That chunk of cash could pay for 14 more months of child care, 74 more weeks of groceries and an additional 10 months of rent for the average woman.

Fifty years ago this week, Martin Luther King Jr. went to Memphis, Tennessee, to march with the city’s striking black sanitation workers. Wages were bad, and conditions were so unsafe that workers were seriously injured or even killed while using the trash compactors of their trucks. The city of Memphis, their employer, refused to do better; city officials refused to act to improve their wages or safety.