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Weekly Labor Legislative Update on the 87th Texas Legislature
A bill that would clear a path for nurses who contracted COVID-19 to receive Workers’ Compensation coverage (where available) won final passage today in the Texas House.
The Texas House today gave final approval to a labor-backed “Helmets to Hardhats” bill that can help steer military veterans to apprenticeship training programs.
The Texas House voted today to keep a practice that denies many Texas construction workers basic job benefits.

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Recent Press Releses

With growing membership, a budget back in the black and a strike fund that is rising by the year, the Auto Workers are much stronger than they were four years ago, retiring union President Dennis Williams says.

And if you really want a comparison, Williams added one bombshell at the end of his keynote address to the union’s convention, which opened June 11 in Detroit: “We have looked death in the eyes during the Great Recession.”

A federal court in Philadelphia struck down a new city law that barred employers from asking job candidates about their salary history. The ruling has serious ramifications for the fight to narrow the gender wage gap.

Graduate student unions are in the news again, with campuses across the US deciding to allow--and not to allow--graduate students to unionize. 

In October 2016, we reported that National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) would require private universities to bargain with graduate student labor unions on compensation and working conditions. 

It's no secret that the financial divide between CEOs and average worker in the U.S. has been growing. But in one case, the pay gap between corporate chiefs and employees has reached almost 6,000-to-1: Weight Watchers, where CEO Mindy Grossman earned 5,908 times what the median worker took home last year.

Texas voters spoke clearly and in bipartisan fashion for progress in Tuesday’s runoff elections, endorsing an agenda in which public education and the larger concerns of working people take priority over wedge issues, Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy said today.

CEO pay for major companies in the United States rose nearly 6% in the past year, as income inequality and the outsourcing of good-paying American jobs have increased. According to the new AFL-CIO Executive Paywatch, the average CEO of an S&P 500 Index company made $13.94 million in 2017—361 times more money than the average U.S. rank-and-file worker.