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Still Needed: Stop Whitley Confirmation; Clean Up Election Legislation

 The Texas AFL-CIO today congratulated Latino voting rights organizations and allies for obt

Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy issued this statement regarding today’s decision in United States Department of Commerce v. New York:

Picks Pockets of Working Families, Texans in Poverty

Patt Moon-Updike wanted to be a nurse since she was 9 years old.

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Journalists at the Los Angeles Times have overwhelmingly elected to form a union, a first for the 136-year-old news organization that for much of its history was known for its opposition to organized labor.

The union drive was launched publicly in October and culminated in an election earlier this month. Results, tallied Friday by the National Labor Relations Board, show workers voted 248 to 44 to be represented by the Washington, D.C.-based NewsGuild-Communications Workers of America.

The Texas AFL-CIO COPE Convention, set for this weekend in Austin, will feature the first one-on-one forum between gubernatorial candidates Lupe Valdez and Andrew White, along with an appearance by a union candidate who is making a big splash among working people in his quest to oust U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan from office.

  The COPE convention takes place Saturday, Jan. 20, and Sunday, Jan. 21 at the Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol, 701 E. 11th St., in downtown Austin.

The middle class has been on a steady slide for decades. Signs of this slide are all around us: anemic wage growth, historic income inequality, chronic unemployment and underemployment and, not coincidentally, the steady erosion of workers’ freedom to join unions and bargain for fair wages and benefits. At the same time, American households are facing rising costs that far outpace their stagnant wages.

To Washington, D.C. insiders, this month’s budget negotiations are just the latest partisan exercise in a series of manufactured crises that too often result in short-term solutions. But for those who live and work outside of the Beltway bubble, much more is at stake.

What happens in the coming days has the potential to fundamentally shift the balance of power in the workplace. Nothing less than the right to dream, live, work and retire in security is on the table as Congress faces key decisions and deadlines.

Imagine this: It's Sunday morning and you walk into the church you grew up attending. You have not been to service in a few years. For most of that time, you worked the night shift as an emergency-room nurse and the occasional weekends you had off were filled with sick children, aging parents and digging out from snowstorms. But you are there now. The usher asks your name and when you answer, he frowns and says "I'm so sorry, since you haven't exercised your religious freedom in the last six years, I'll have to ask you to leave."

The Trump administration announced Monday that it will terminate the provisional residency permits of about 200,000 Salvadorans who have lived in the country since at least 2001, leaving them to face deportation.