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Our movement’s accomplishments remain relevant, but this is not a normal Labor Day. We are not in a normal time in history. This may be the last moment voters can repair the damage before we are too far gone.
Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy, joined by a group of unemployed Texans on the eve of the cancellation of the $600 per week in unemployment coronavirus federal aid, pushed for the US Senate to pass the HEROES Act.
The Texas AFL-CIO today congratulated M.J. Hegar on winning the Democratic nomination for the U.S. Senate seat, calling on Texans to vote on Nov. 3 for a new national path on issues that matter to working families.

 The Texas AFL-CIO and Every Texan (formerly known as the Center for Public Policy Priorities) today proposed a 10-point plan for reforming the Unemployment Insurance system in Texas.

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Letter Carriers member Paul Trotman was lucky his house survived Hurricane Florence. When the dust settled, he applied for a Union Plus Disaster Relief Grant, a benefit of being an eligible Union Plus Credit Cardholder. He and his family used the $500 grant to get back on their feet.
For her entire adult life, CSEA member Guaren Long has wanted to go back to school to get the college education she felt was missing from her life. When she got an email from the Union Plus Free College Program, she enrolled immediately and hasn’t looked back. With just five classes left, Long has been very happy with her experience and credits the program’s flexibility and course offerings.

A decade ago, General Motors was on the verge of collapse. Facing down an earth-shattering financial crisis, tens of thousands of UAW members agreed to help save an American icon — and the economy along with it.

Autoworkers took on personal financial sacrifices, conceding contract victories that had taken years to secure. Working harder and longer for less, they ultimately carried GM out of bankruptcy and into a period of record-breaking profits.

When about 48,000 workers went on strike Monday against General Motors, they launched the largest American labor stoppage against any business since the financial crisis.

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said Wednesday it plans to shelve an Obama-era rule to collect pay data in what Democratic lawmakers and advocates said was a setback to efforts to achieve equal pay for women and people of color.

The five-year fight to expand overtime pay to millions of workers is over.