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We are appalled over the events of a few days ago but we hold out hope. We mourn, but we believe in a better future. We “pray for the dead and fight like hell for the living.”

The political arm of the Texas AFL-CIO today delivered a dual endorsement of M.J. Hegar and Royce West in the U.S. Senate race.

Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy commended U.S. Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Austin, and the other 12 Democratic members of the Texas congressional delegation for proposing a temporary boost for unemployed Texans.
Gov. Greg Abbott’s plan to start reopening Texas businesses lacks critical elements that would protect Texans who are required to return to their work premises, Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy said today.

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The Workers First Caravan national day of action events scheduled for June 3rd have been postponed. We will be joining together in the near future to demand our elected leaders to address the economic crisis facing our nation, but now is the time to fully engage in the national conversation underway on racism and racial injustice. The labor movement will never stop fighting until oppression is vanquished in all its forms and we achieve economic, social and racial justice.

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka said in an interview with The Hill’s Steve Clemons on Thursday that President Trump has “considered workers expendable” in efforts to reopen economies and workplaces.

The president of the Utility Workers Union of America called yesterday for a federal infectious disease standard for the workplace as one member of his union described being "terrified" of working during the coronavirus pandemic. The push for a federal standard by James Slevin, whose union has about 50,000 members, followed legal action this week by the AFL-CIO that aims to force the Occupational Safety and Health Administration to issue an emergency temporary standard for infectious diseases. "We definitely need this today," Slevin told reporters on a conference call.

AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Elizabeth Shuler said the union is using the pandemic to galvanize Amazon workers at company headquarters and enlist support from elected officials. Amazon had over 53,000 employees in Seattle in 2019. “Amazon’s backyard is Seattle, and that’s a major focus for us in terms of how to take the energy, the courage, the activism that we are already seeing there and build that into a real movement,” she said.

With states reopening for business and millions of people heading back to work, the nation's largest labor organization is demanding the federal government do more to protect workers from contracting the coronavirus on the job.

What's happening: The AFL-CIO, a collection of 55 unions representing 12.5 million workers, says it is suing the federal agency in charge of workplace safety to compel them to create a set of emergency temporary standards for infectious diseases.

Even Labor Secretary Eugene Scalia’s recent letter to AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka, intended to defend his agency’s performance, offers little in terms of real enforcement. The word “guidance” and its variant “guidelines” appear nine times, as well as the observation that “employers are implementing measures to protect workers” (emphasis in original). Absent from the letter: the word “citation.” The word “penalty.”