News

Today is Day 4 of the 140-day regular session of the 86thTexas Legislature.  

Texas AFL-CIO Opposes Workforce Commission Proposal That Could Convert Some Gig Economy Workers Into ‘Marketplace Contractors’

Teachers overwhelmingly approved a new contract Tuesday and planned to return to the classroom after a six-day strike over funding and staffing in the nation’s second-largest school district.

Although all votes hadn’t been counted, preliminary figures showed that a “vast supermajority” of some 30,000 educators voted in favor of the tentative deal, “therefore ending the strike and heading back to schools tomorrow,” said Alex Caputo-Pearl, president of United Teachers Los Angeles.

Eight hundred thousand workers. That is the number of government employees and contractors impacted by President Trump’s shutdown of the federal government. The average take home pay of impacted workers is around $500 per week, and any financial uncertainty is sure to cause stress and anxiety over how to make ends meet. Each day of this manufactured crisis, working families lose money for housing, healthcare and groceries — the essentials we need to get by.

Furloughed federal employees and out-of-work contractors greeted one another Thursday with a sarcastic nickname that, on the 20th day of a partial government shutdown, captured their feeling of powerlessness: “Hello, fellow pawns.”

They shouted it to one another over the brutal wind and bitter cold on Thursday in downtown Washington, where hundreds gathered to demand government leaders put an end to the shutdown and allow them to get back to work.

Texas AFL-CIO: Communities Everywhere Being Harmed

With President Trump in Texas today for a pointless “photo opportunity,” the Texas AFL-CIO called for a resolution of the nearly three-week government shutdown that is harming not just 800,000 federal workers, but the entire nation.

Welcome to the 2019 edition of The ULLCO Sentinel. “ULLCO” is the United Labor Legislative Committee, the lobbying arm of the Texas AFL-CIO representing Texas labor unions and participating allies.

Today is Day Minus-4 of the regular session of the 86th Texas Legislature. Blastoff and the start of a 140-day clock takes place Tuesday, Jan. 8th, with the session running until Monday, May 27th, Memorial Day. 

1. Janus dealt a heavy blow to labor—but public-sector unions didn’t crumble overnight.

In June, the Supreme Court issued its long-awaited ruling in Janus v. AFSCME—and it was just as bad as everyone feared. In a 5-to-4 decision, the court found that public-sector unions violated the First Amendment by collecting so-called fair-share fees from workers who aren’t union members but benefit from collective bargaining regardless.

A federal employee union sued the Trump administration Monday over the government shutdown, claiming it is illegal for agencies to force employees to work without pay.

Statement by Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy:

"If allowed to stand, today's outrageous ruling by a Fort Worth-based federal judge could eventually deprive millions of working people of a fair shot at affordable health care."

"We are ashamed that Gov. Abbott, indicted Attorney General Paxton and shadowy Texas interests that cannot abide a historic expansion of health care are undermining one of the clearest messages of the Nov. 6 election: Americans want and need affordable coverage for pre-existing conditions."